Academic Misconduct

Like all higher education institutions, the University of East London takes academic integrity very seriously. Breaching the principles of the Academic Integrity Policy and by extension the Academic Misconduct Policy, if detected, can have serious implications for your studies.

You may find that following the submission of an assessment or the sitting of an exam, you receive a letter from the university saying you are being investigated for breaching Part 8 of Academic Misconduct Regulations. Where students are found to have breached the Academic Misconduct regulations the process of investigating an academic misconduct will begin.

Reasons for falling foul of these regulations are varied and can be quite worrying for students. It is important that student read our guidance so they aware of the procedure following an allegation of misconduct.

 

Please click the following links to skip to the relevant sections of this guide.

What is meant by “academic integrity”?

What is academic misconduct?

Plagiarism

Self-plagiarism

Collusion

Submitting work you did not write yourself

Importation of unauthorised materials into an exam room

Refusing to comply with invigilator instructions in an exam

Disruption and mobile telephones in exams

Other offences

What can I do to avoid plagiarism or collusion?

I don’t understand the academic misconduct penalty I have been given. What is the “Tariff of penalties?”

 

Investigating misconduct

I have received a letter accusing me of academic misconduct and I have been invited to a School meeting, what do I do?

What happens if you don’t attend a School meeting?

What will they ask me in the School meeting?

Who you can bring with your at the School meeting?

What is a Level A penalty?

Do I have to accept a Level A penalty at the School Meeting?

What is an Academic Misconduct Officer?

I have a meeting with an Academic Misconduct Officer, what will happen?

What if I do not want to accept the allegation?

What is an Evidence Based Proposal?

How should I structure my evidence based proposal?

What will the Responsible Officers look for in an evidence based proposal?

I have been called in for a “viva voce” interview?

How viva’s are conducted?

What happens if you don’t attend a viva?

 

Appealing

I want to appeal academic misconduct, but my resits are approaching, what should I do?

I have been allowed to present my case to an Academic Misconduct Panel. What happens at the panel?

My appeal was rejected by the panel, what can I do?

Can I take my case to the Office of the Independent Adjudicator (OIA)?

 

Other issues

How can academic misconduct affect Progression?

I wear a hijab, turban, kippah, or taqiyah, will I have to remove this if asked by an invigilator?

I have signed and accepted a Level A penalty but I have changed my mind, what can I do?

 

What is meant by “academic integrity”?

Academic integrity is a set of principles for acting ethically in the way you conduct your studies, whether that be taking part in exams or producing coursework.

The regulations on academic integrity at UEL are outlined in the Academic Integrity Policy.

Key elements of upholding academic integrity include honesty and avoiding cheating or plagiarising.

You may be new to Higher Education but hopefully the groundwork of these principles will have been taught to you at earlier stages of your academic journey. If not or if you are unsure of what is expected of you we would advise you discuss this with the academics on your course or your Personal Tutor.

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What is academic misconduct?

Committing academic misconduct can be intentional, or unintentional.

The university defines academic misconduct as any type of cheating in an assessment, often for the purpose of achieving a personal gain. The following list is not exhaustive but encompasses the majority of offences committed by students at UEL. An accusation of academic misconduct may include one or more of the following offences:

 

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the most common offence committed by students at UEL and in higher education generally.

In the simplest terms the Oxford English Dictionary describes plagiarism as “the practice of taking someone else's work or ideas and passing them off as one's own”. UEL’s Academic Misconduct Policy defines plagiarism as:

  • The presentation of another person’s work as one’s own with or without obtaining permission to use it.
     
  • The inclusion within one’s own work of material (written, visual or oral), originally produced by another person, without suitable acknowledgment.
     
  • The inclusion within one’s work of concepts paraphrased from elsewhere without citing your source.
     
  • The inclusion in submitted work of sections of text, whether from electronic or hard copy sources, without appropriate acknowledgement of the source.
     
  • The submission of work that the student, as the author, has previously submitted, without suitable acknowledgement of the source of their previous work; this should not normally be more than a short quotation as the same work cannot be submitted for different assignments.
     
  • Including or quoting the work of other students in one’s work, with the exception of published work, or outputs held in the library as a learning resource, which should be cited and acknowledged appropriately.

 

  • Practices such as ‘cutting and pasting’ segments of text into your work, without citing the source of each.

Plagiarism can be intentional, by way of attempting to take the ideas or words of another person and passing them off as your own without citing your source or letting the reader know that you did not come up with those ideas or words yourself.

Plagiarism can also be unintentional. Students may forget to correctly cite their sources in the appropriate way using the “Harvard” referencing format or may have forgotten to cite the source in their bibliography.

Intentional or not plagiarism is normally detected at UEL when your work is submitted via Turnitin. Turnitin analyses a database of submitted work from across the academic world as well as the internet and will detect matches that have not been correctly cited or acknowledged.

This means that by submitting work early and using Turnitin effectively you can ensure your work is properly cited and rigorous enough for final submission.

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Self-plagiarism

It is possible to plagiarise yourself by re-using work you have previously submitted without acknowledgement.

Whether or not this will be considered to be academic misconduct or simply poor academic practice will depend on whether you have cited your previous submission as well as how substantial the quotation is in length.

The Academic Misconduct Policy states the following as academic misconduct:

The submission of work that the student, as the author, has previously submitted, without suitable acknowledgement of the source of their previous work; this should not normally be more than a short quotation as the same work cannot be submitted for different assignments.

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Collusion

Collusion is normally defined as two or more students working together to complete coursework and submitting the result. It can also include two or more students arranging to cheat in an examination.

Allegations of collusion can also occur where work is shared in good faith or where work is stolen.

The Academic Misconduct Policy defines collusion as:

  • The submission, as if it were one’s own work, of anything which has been offered to you for your use, but which is actually not your own work.
     
  • Including or quoting the work of other students in one’s work, with the exception of published work, or outputs held in the library as a learning resource, which should be cited and acknowledged appropriately
     
  • Being party to any arrangement whereby the work of one candidate is represented as that of another.
     
  • The submission, as your own work, of any work that has been purchased, or otherwise obtained from others, whether this is from other students, online services, “cheat sites”, or other agents or sources that sell or provide assignments.
     
  • For work not intended to be submitted as a collaborative assignment: producing work with one or more other students, using study practices that mean the submitted work is nearly identical, overall or in part, to that of other students.

You may also find yourself accused of collusion if another student were to obtain your work and submit this without your permission. In many cases the match in similarity between the two pieces of work will be detected via Turnitin and both students will be investigated.

For this reason we advise you to never share your work with another student, even if you are trying to assist and have good intentions or trust the person you are sharing your work with.

Collusion can happen unintentionally and not sharing your work eliminates the possibility of it taking place.

You are also expected to keep your work, IT account and computer secure to ensure other students cannot obtain your work to pass off as their own.

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Submitting work you did not write yourself

Offences in this category can also include collusion (as above) but this area usually involves the use of “essay mills” or “essay writing services” by students.

These services would write an essay on a student’s behalf for payment. They may also claim to be discrete and state that any such essay will avoid detection via Turnitin.

No matter how desperate you feel there is always support available via the Skillzone, your Personal Tutor or other academic staff. The use of essay mills is a conscious choice and will be seen as a serious instance of gross dishonesty and such an allegation could have serious consequences for your studies.

If there is suspicion that you may have purchased your essay, you are likely to be investigated via “viva voce” [[internal link]]

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Importation of unauthorised materials into an exam room

“Importation” means bringing items or materials that are prohibited into an exam. This can include a wide range of items or materials. Normally prior to an examination you will be told which items you are allowed to bring into the room. Any other items are normally prohibited.

You can be accused of importation if you are found with:

  • Paper or notes
  • Writing on your hands, body, or clothing
  • Notes or paper stored in other locations on campus (such as the toilet)
  • Labels of drink bottles
  • Audio/visual devices or other prohibited electronic items (headphones, phones, recording devices, smartwatches etc.)

This list is not exhaustive. You could also be asked to remove hats or headwear or other loose items of clothing. This includes religious clothing.

Your phone should be placed under your desk face down or should otherwise be placed in your bag, and should not sound during the exam. Phones should be switched off and placed under the desk, this is University policy. They can no longer be in a bag, they must be under your table.

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Refusing to comply with invigilator instructions in an exam

You may be asked to do something in an examination by an invigilator. Refusing to follow an instruction will be seen as academic misconduct, and is likely to be reported by the invigilator.

If prohibited materials are found to have been brought into the examination room (“importation”, see above) you may be asked to surrender these. Refusing to do so will also be seen as refusing to comply with the instructions of an invigilator.

Arguing with an invigilator about an instruction is likely to be seen as a disruption to the exam (see below) and also a refusal to comply with a request.

Invigilators may request you remove your hat or other headwear, or other loose items of clothing to check for prohibited items.

This includes religious items of clothing. They are allowed to do this so long as they do this in a sensitive way and you must comply with their request.

We are aware of instances where students believe requests made by invigilators have been unnecessary, unfair, and discriminatory or that invigilators have needlessly distracted students from their examinations. If this is the case we would advise that nevertheless you try and continue to comply with the invigilator at all times, complete the exam and book an appointment to see an Adviser afterwards. You may be eligible to make an academic appeal or a complaint.

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Disruption and mobile telephones in exams

Disruption can be defined in many ways. Disruption in exams is normally a student talking to another student or otherwise making unnecessary and persistent noise when a request has been made to stop doing so.

Further, your mobile telephone should be entirely switched off and not simply placed on silent. If your phone is a Blackberry device the battery should be removed, they are known to still sound alarms despite being switched off.

If your phone is found to vibrate loudly or otherwise make a noise in the exam you will automatically receive a Level A penalty.

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Other offences

There are other offences that can be committed under the regulations. These include blatant cheating and copying from other students in exams, or attempting to bribe invigilators and examiners.

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What can I do to avoid plagiarism or collusion?

Avoiding these offences is a matter of academic good practice. Following a few simple rules can ensure you uphold good academic practice and avoid falling foul of the regulations throughout your studies and future career.

You should use Turnitin ahead of your submission to check your “originality index” and correct any areas where you have not referenced correctly.

You can also utilise the support of Skillzone and your Personal Tutors for more support.

There are also many resources online to assist you with Harvard referencing. 

You should not share your work with anyone and be careful in group work assignments.

If you feel you are struggling with referencing you can prepare a draft of your work and present this to your Module Leader to see if you have followed the correct referencing guidelines. It depends on the Module Leader and how busy they are, but you can request further help if you really need it in such circumstances.

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I don’t understand the academic misconduct penalty I have been given. What is the “Tariff of penalties?”

Penalty

 

What is it?

Will it be recorded on my transcript?

What triggers this kind of penalty?

Level A

 

First breach of a non-serious offence

 

A student who plagiarises or colludes for the first time will be issued with a Level A Penalty if there is a prima facie case (a case to answer) provided that there is no evidence that s/he has behaved in a pre-meditated dishonest way. The work concerned will be awarded a mark of 0.

 

First opportunity

Where a Level A Penalty is issued at the first assessment opportunity, the relevant component at reassessment will be capped at the minimum pass mark.

 

Reassessment opportunity

Where a Level A Penalty is issued at a reassessment opportunity, the Subject Area Progression Board will determine the appropriate consequence.

 

***Any further or future offence, will attract a Level B penalty – See below

 

A Level A Penalty is a penalty but is neither recorded on a transcript, nor reported to a professional body

Poor Referencing

 

Copying and pasting large paragraphs without citing sources

 

Harvard referencing

 

Poor paraphrasing  

 

Not writing a bibliography

 

Not using your own words

 

If your mobile phone sounds during the exam (provided they did not act dishonestly, if they did then proceeds to Level B )

Level B

 

 

 

 

First instance of serious academic misconduct and/or any academic misconduct following a Level A Penalty

 

 

 

In practice, a Level B is applied more in Exam breaches. This is because the university say that there is a high chance of intention to cheat in an exam.

 

A student will fail the module with a mark of 0.

 

Where a level B penalty is issued at the first assessment point, the student will be required to retake the entire module at the next assessment point. (these include components that you have not breached on)

 

All components of the relevant module will be capped at the minimum pass mark.

 

Reassessment

Where a level B penalty is issued at the reassessment point, the Subject Area Progression Board will determine the appropriate consequence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes it will  be recorded on your transcript

Attempting to copy from another student in an examination.

 

Importing prohibited materials of any type into an examination room

 

Any instance of academic misconduct that has been preceded by a Level A penalty

 

Level C

 

Serious Academic Misconduct (with premeditated intention (even if it is your first time offence)

And/or

If you have a previous Level B penalty

 

The student will be suspended from their studies for the following academic year.

 

Student will fail the module on which the breach occurred. (included passed components)

 

Offence at first assessment point – suspension will apply from term one of the following academic year

 

Offence at Reassessment

Progression board will decide the consequences

 

 

 

 

 

Yes this penalty can be recorded on your transcript

This can happen after you have been given a penalty B and you have breached regulations again

 

This can happen where student is grossly dishonest for example theft, falsification, purchase, or having a directly adverse effect on other students

 

Or

 

Impersonation, bribery, using prohibited material in exam, or intimidating a invigilator

Level D

 

Expulsion from the course 

The offence would be very serious, this will be applied if you had a previous Level C penalty and you again breached the regulations

 

Or

 

When the breach is extremely serious that it warrants expulsion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Investigating misconduct

 

I have received a letter accusing me of academic misconduct and I have been invited to a School meeting, what do I do?

This means meeting with your lecturer and one other member of School staff to discuss the allegation. This meeting can only give the lowest of penalties (see tariff) [LJF10] and is intended to help you to avoid repeating your mistake and to help you improve your practice in the future.

The meeting is meant to be a supportive one, as it is understood that an incident of plagiarism or collusion can happen unknowingly or accidentally. The meeting is intended to help you to understand what the problem is and how to avoid it in the future, and it’s likely you will be informed of further areas of support such as Skill zone or your Personal Tutor

This meeting does not aim to impose severe penalties or punish you, but simply to try and support you to avoid further breaches.

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What happens if you don’t attend a School meeting?

You must co-operate with the investigation process as to do otherwise could harm your case.

If you do not attend the meeting there is a possibility that a decision can be made in your absence. If you cannot attend due to other commitments, you must inform the university in advance.

If you have missed the appointment due to unforeseen circumstances, and later provide evidence, the meeting may be re-scheduled for you.

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What will they ask me in the School meeting?

They will explain what has happened and highlight where the breach has occurred. They will provide you with evidence of this i.e. turnitin report. You can take a look at this during the meeting and then explain what happened from your perspective.

You will have a chance to explain what went wrong or whether you agree to the breach or not. Sometimes students do poorly reference or make mistakes so this would also be your opportunity to get some help on how to avoid further or future breaches.

If you feel that you have not committed a breach, you can challenge this. Please see the section regarding Level A penalties. 

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Who you can bring with your at the School meeting?

You can bring a friend or an Adviser from the Student Union. We cannot always attend School Meetings due to demand and the are quite straightforward but if your case appears complex or you really need someone there, we can attempt to make arrangements for you.

If you do not attend with an Adviser and require advice after the meeting you should reject any proposed penalty and contact us immediately for support.

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What is a Level A penalty?

Level A Penalty is commonly applied by the university in School Meetings. It is the lowest form of all penalties for an academic misconduct breach and is normally used for first time offences.

It is often referred to as a ‘warning’ and is issued to ensure a further breach does not take place. It is not registered on your results transcript or reported to a professional body.

It is kept on university file and if you commit a further breach, you will receive a higher penalty which will appear on your transcript and can lead to more serious consequences.

Accepting a Level A penalty can have a few affects. Please refer to the tariff here.

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Do I have to accept a Level A penalty at the School Meeting?

No, because not all cases are the same and each case is dealt with on its own merits. If you do not feel as if you committed academic misconduct you can reject the penalty and you will be referred to the Academic Misconduct Officer (AMO) for a meeting. You should contact the Students’ Union immediately for advice.

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What is an Academic Misconduct Officer?

This person usually administers the Academic Misconduct Process once the case has been referred to them. They deal with cases that are either:

  1. First offences of serious academic misconduct; or
  2. Where students rejected penalty at a School meeting

If you choose to deny the allegation and take the matter further the Academic Misconduct Officer does not decide the outcome of your case as it is investigated by two “Responsible Officers” within Schools other than your own.

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I have a meeting with an Academic Misconduct Officer, what will happen?

This meeting will usually take place if you did not accept a Level A penalty at a School Meeting, or if the offence occurred in an exam or for any other serious offence attracting a high penalty (Level B and above).

Usually a letter is sent to students outlining the allegation against them and the proposed penalty. This does not mean that the penalty has been applied.

The meeting is arranged to discuss the allegations and whether you accept the allegation or not. Any available evidence will also be provided to you.

You will have every opportunity to talk about your side of the case. You may feel as if the allegation is not fair and you have grounds to challenge the allegation. In this case you may bring evidence (such as drafts, notes or other material) to show that you did not breach the regulations.

Sometimes students may attend the meeting and realise that they have evidence to prove that the allegations are not substantiated. You can reject the penalty and then come and see us or send the evidence to the Academic Misconduct Officer to ask whether the School will drop the case. Sometimes the case can be dropped if the School feel that you have strong evidence against the allegation or a penalty may be lowered.

You will be given 7 days to decide whether you reject or accept the penalty in order to consider your case and seek further advice.

If you accept the penalty, they will outline the implication of the accepted penalty and notify your School.

If you decide to reject the penalty, they will explain the process for rejecting the penalty and you will be asked to draft an Evidence Based Proposal within 10 days from the date of deadline.

Also see the section below regarding rejecting the penalty or allegation.

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What if I do not want to accept the allegation?

Before you make a decision to reject the penalty, it is important to note that you will need to prove that you did not commit the breach or you have grounds to believe that the penalty is too high.

Evidence isn’t just confined to written evidence, it is also circumstantial or verbal.

You can reject the penalty based on any of the following from Part 8 of the academic misconduct policy:

(a) does not admit academic misconduct because s/he has suitable grounds to challenge the decision; and /or

(b) feels that there are unique and particular circumstances and/or

 (c) admits academic misconduct but does not accept the proposed penalty
 

See below for what constitutes an Evidence Based Proposal

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What is an Evidence Based Proposal?

There is no definition enshrined within the Academic Misconduct Policy regarding an evidence based proposal.

An evidence based proposal is a statement from the student denying the allegation against them.

The purpose is to convince the Responsible officer that you have grounds for challenging the offence. It is NOT a mitigating circumstances statement.

It should cover an explanation as to why you feel that the allegation against you is untrue. It may include any other information that could help the university investigate your case further or help drop the case at an earlier stage.

For an evidence based proposal to stand, it is important that it is corroborated with evidence.

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How should I structure my evidence based proposal?

Click here for our guidance on writing an evidence based proposal.

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What will the Responsible Officers look for in an evidence based proposal?

Responsible Officers will look to see if your case has sufficient grounds to be held in front of an Academic Misconduct Panel. They will be independent and impartial to your case and are not part of the School investigatory process.

Sometimes your case might be dealt with the School if you can present an evidence based proposal with concreate evidence, but this may not always be the case as it is for the discretion of the School whether they wish to drop the case, reduce the penalty or re-consider your case.

When the Responsible Officers do receive your evidence based proposal, they will consider the following grounds

  • Full range of issues highlighted in your evidence based proposal.
  • Details of the alleged breach
  • There is new and material evidence which the student was, for exceptional reasons, unable to present previously
  • The procedures were not complied with to the extent that it was questionable whether the outcome would have been different had the procedures been complied with
  • There is documented evidence of bias

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I have been called in for a “viva voce” interview?

This usually forms part of UEL’s investigation process when they have reason to believe that the work you produced is not entirely your own, and the concept an theories may belong to someone else. This can happen when the assessor cannot identify where parts of your work have been obtained.

Often this would happen in the case of collusion, however we have seen cases where this procedure is used when there is doubts as to whether the work was in fact produced by the student.

You may receive a request to attend a School Meeting where a “viva voce” interview or examination takes place.

The email or letter inviting you to a viva will be explicit and should include guidance as to how the viva will be conducted.

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How viva’s are conducted?

You will be told by the module leader or subject tutor that they believe the work you have provided may not be written by you. A viva is held for you to prove that this work belongs to you and has been written by you. You will be given the opportunity to explain and go through your work.

You will be asked questions about the work, sources, ideas, and theories in order for them to be satisfied that the work was written by you. Some students may be asked to write a paragraph from their essay in the meeting.

You could bring any evidence with you to the meetings if you feel that will help prove that the work was written by you.

The viva usually takes no longer than 30 minutes.

A note taker may be present in the meeting.

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What happens if you don’t attend a viva?

If the student does not appear at the date and time scheduled for the School Meeting, or refuses to take part in a viva voce interview, the Responsible Officer will consider whether any reasons offered are valid for not attending.

If there are valid reasons put forward by the student, then they can adjourn the meeting to a further date.

If no valid reasons are provided for missing the viva voce, then the penalty can be applied without the right to appeal.

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Appealing
 

I want to appeal academic misconduct, but my resits are approaching, what should I do?

When students are appealing academic misconduct they should continue as normal and complete the resits, even if you feel this is unfair.

This is because the time between the release of results/misconduct investigations and resits is very short, meaning resits are likely to take place before your case has concluded.

This means that if you do not complete your resits and any appeal against the misconduct fails you will be in a difficult position having missed your resit opportunities.

You can still claim extenuating circumstances if you have reasons to do so. 

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I have been allowed to present my case to an Academic Misconduct Panel. What happens at the panel?

Both parties (yourself and a member of staff representing the School) will be invited to the panel and will be informed of date, time and venue advance. You will also receive a full pack of panel paperwork before the panel date.

You can have someone present with you at the hearing, such as a relative, friend, colleague or Students’ Union Adviser.

There will be an independent appeal panel who will hear the case from both parties. Both parties will have the opportunity to put forward their case in front of an appeal panel.

You may be asked some questions from the panel. You will also have an opportunity to ask questions of the School bringing the case against you.

After a summary the panel will conclude. The panel will retire to make a decision, based on the written and oral evidence.

You will normally hear back within 24 hours in writing, with more detailed minutes to follow later.

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My appeal was rejected by the panel, what can I do?

There is no appeal against the decision of a panel unless you can prove your case falls within the grounds below:

  1. There is new and material evidence which the student was unable to present to the panel
  2. The procedures were not complied with and the outcome would have been different had the procedures been complied with
  3. There is documented evidence of bias by the panel or clerk
  4. The penalty imposed exceeded what the Panel can offer

You have 20 days from the date of the appeal decision to appeal. We would advise that you get in touch with the Students’ Union to discuss the Panel decision.

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Can I take my case to the Office of the Independent Adjudicator (OIA)?

You can only take the case to the OIA once the UEL internal procedures are exhausted through the university process.

The OIA are an independent body who are external from the university. Their role is to review individual complaints by students against higher education providers.

You will receive a Completion of Procedure letter from the university when all stages have been exhausted.

You should contact us for further advice.

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Other issues
 

How can academic misconduct affect Progression?

If you have an academic misconduct penalty applied, you will normally need to re-sit the work in question in the summer resit period.

In serious cases, or cases where there is a common reoccurrence (Level B), you may be asked to do repeat the entire module.

Student’s end of academic year success is now decided by the Progression Board.

When students decide to accept penalties there could be implications on the amount of attempts they have exhausted. For example, you may have committed a breach on your final attempt, and what happens will be decided by the progression board.

You will need to ensure that you are aware of these implications before accepting any penalty.

There are some cases that penalties will be lowered due to disproportionate affects on a students’ progression but there has to be strong reasons put forward to the School for this to be considered.

If you are concerned about your progression please book an appointment or contact us for email advice.

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I wear a hijab, turban, kippah, or taqiyah, will I have to remove this if asked by an invigilator?

Yes. Religious headwear can be checked under and sometimes students can be taken to separate rooms by a member of the appropriate gender for this to happen sensitively.

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I have signed and accepted a Level A penalty but I have changed my mind, what can I do?

Once you have accepted a Level A penalty by signing the relevant form this will be applied against your record and you cannot take this back.

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